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English language learners (ELLs), in content-area courses, have a double challenge meaning that they are expected to learn content and language at the same time (Colorado, 2007). ELLs struggle in content-area lessons such as literature, math, social studies, and science because they have not gained the language, literacy skills, or background knowledge essential to master new content knowledge. One way of dealing with this challenge is through effective lesson planning. Relying on their different levels of English proficiency and literacy, ELLs will gain from the skills, which a well-designed lesson can tackle. Effective lessons comprise of building background knowledge, guided practice, explicit instruction and modeling, peer practice, and assessment of content learned (Colorado, 2007). Student-teacher interactions along with peer interactions are significant for learning. Owing to the diversity in the background and experience that ELLs bring to the classroom, it is necessary to prepare lessons that deal with a broad range of needs. This wide sweep will also benefit all students in a classroom whether English language learners or not (Hall, 2008).